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Midwest Ear Institute specializes in the diagnosis and treatment of dizziness and balance problems as they relate to the ear.  To find out more about our Balance Center, click here.  Read on below to learn more about the specific balance conditions we treat.

 


Feeling unsteady or dizzy can be caused by many factors such as poor circulation, inner ear disease, medication usage, injury, infection, allergies, and/or neurological disease. Dizziness is treatable, but it is important to first determine the exact cause so that the correct treatment is implemented. Symptoms that warrant an immediate visit to the doctor or emergency department include a high fever, severe headache, convulsions, ongoing vomiting, chest pain, heart palpitations, shortness of breath, inability to move an arm or leg, a change in vision or speech, or hearing loss.

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One of the most common causes of dizziness originating in the inner ear is Ménière’s disease. It is a condition that causes vertigo (attacks of a spinning sensation), hearing loss, tinnitus (a roaring, buzzing, or ringing sound in the ear), and a sensation of fullness in the affected ear.

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Some migraine sufferers experience varying degrees of dizziness with or without an associated headache. This occurs three times more often in females, often with a history of motion intolerance as a child. The dizziness varies from true vertigo to a lightheadedness and unsteady sensation lasting hours to days. There may be associated hearing loss and tinnitus. The diagnosis often depends on excluding other ear conditions which MAD mimics, such as Meniérè’s disease. The treatment is directed at the elimination of the triggering factors, dietary measures (migraine diet), and medications (tricyclic antidepressants, beta-blockers, calcium-channel blockers). Consultation with a neurologist may be necessary as well.
Vertigo is experienced after a change in head position such as lying down, turning in bed, looking up, or stooping. It lasts about 30 seconds and ceases when the head is still. It is due to a dislodged otololith crystal entering one of the semicircular balance canals. It can last for days, weeks, or months. The Epley “repositioning” treatment by an otolaryngologist is usually curative. BPV is the most common cause of dizziness after (even a mild) head injury.

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Labyrinthitis is an infection or inflammation of the inner ear.

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Vestibular Neuritis is an infection or inflammation of the balance nerve between the inner ear balance system and the brain.

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